Measuring your effectiveness or converting viewers to readers

Earlier today I was asked what I use measure my effectiveness online.

@franksting so (being careful NOT to use said hashtag…) … what monitoring/measuring tools do you use, and why? 🙂Tue Aug 31 00:46:03 via TweetDeck

While I initially dismissed the questions as applying to me I realised that despite my Continue reading

Twitter Applications and OAuth

Monday, August 30, 2010

If you are like most Twitter users, you have used use a third-party Twitter application to read or send Tweets. As of August 31, Twitter applications will all use OAuth, an authentication method that lets you use apps without them storing your password.

What does this mean for me?
The move to OAuth will mean increased security and a better experience. Applications won’t store your username and password, and if you change your password, applications will continue to work.

With OAuth, you still individually approve each application before using it, and you can revoke access at any time. To see which applications you have authorized or to revoke access, just go to the Connections section under Settings.

One thing to note – to continue to use your favorite applications, you should make sure you are running the latest version of the app. Otherwise, you may soon find that it doesn’t work anymore.

Tell me more about OAuth
In order for Twitter applications to access your account, developers have been able to choose one of two authentication methods: Basic Authentication or OAuth. Both require your permission, but there is an important difference. With Basic Auth, you provide your username and password for the app to access Twitter, and the application has to store and send this information over the Internet each time you use the app. With OAuth, this isn’t the case. Instead, you approve an application to access Twitter, and the application doesn’t store your password.

Fortunately, developers have known about our transition to OAuth since last December, so they’ve had time to update their apps. And many apps, including Echofon, TweetDeck, Twitterrific, Seesmic, and Twitter for Android, iPhone, and BlackBerry, are already using OAuth. We appreciate the work and time that developers have invested in this update in order to keep you safe.

Posted by @ at 1:37 PM

“You know if they had used a computer, they would’ve used a Mac”

Video from NY Times article on Steve Jobs introducing the Think Different Ad Campaign in 1997

I can’t recall if we got this on a “Quicktime LIVE stream” over the intranet or not in 1997 or just watched it the next day via a download. But I do recall everyone being energised by this in the office.

Watching the video makes me feel kind of wistful about leaving Apple less than a year later to come to Australia. But I’ve loved Australia and stayed, with some other benefits.

I kind of think Apple have done OK without me.

“You know if they had used a computer, they would’ve used a Mac”

I can’t recall if we got this on a “Quicktime LIVE stream” over the intranet or not in 1997 or just watched it the next day via a download. But I do recall everyone being energised by this in the office.

Watching the video makes me feel kind of wistful about leaving Apple less than a year later to come to Australia. But I’ve loved Australia and stayed, with some other benefits.

I kind of think Apple have done OK without me.

Killing Twitter Hovercards

Twitter Hovercards: Die.die.die

Figuring out how to disable Twitter’s recommended users to follow feature was so much fun, I thought I’d do it again. From my quick poll, hovercards seem to top the list of next most hated twitter feature. IN case you don’t now, hovercards are those little popups that come up when you mouse over an avatar on a twitter page. I wouldn’t have thought they were next on the list, but what the hell do I know?

Here goes, Ad Blockers first, stylesheets after… All of it after the jump.

You got to read this and click through, and apply to get rid of those annoying bloody things!

The Sex Pistols of the German football league

People didn’t just come for the match now, they came for the party. Drinking beer and smoking are still allowed in the stands, a rarity in modern football. The raucous atmosphere is no surprise given the locals’ immersion in pop and rock culture – The Beatles resided in St Pauli for a few years in the early 1960s. The team even [6] by AC/DC, and every St Pauli goal is celebrated by a rendition of Blur’s ‘Song 2’.

Football as it was meant to be, perhaps? Continue reading